Behaviour Change

PROPAGANDA FOR CHANGE is a project created by the students of Behaviour Change (ps359) and Professor Thomas Hills at the Psychology Department of the University of Warwick. This work was supported by funding from Warwick's Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning.

Friday, February 1, 2013

Sandisk advert




This printed poster by Sandisk uses the persuasive method of metaphor to advertise their USB. In this poster, the fish represents the volume of data in which the USB can hold while the tin represents its physical size. They illustrate that although the size of their product is small, it can hold a large amount of data, which emphasizes convenience in the use of their USB product. 


In a study by Ottati, Rhoads & Graesser (1999), it was shown that metaphor can only increase persuasiveness of a communication if certain conditions are met; when the content resonates with the preferences and interests of the viewer and when the message contains strong and compelling arguments. In their study, they recruited  286 participants (of which who liked or disliked sports) and randomly assigned them to one of four audio-taped conditions; strong arguments plus literal filler sentences, weak arguments plus literal filler sentences, strong arguments plus metaphorical filler sentences, and weak arguments plus metaphorical filler sentences. They found that sports metaphor would increase systematic processing among individuals who like sports but decrease systematic processing among individuals who dislike sports. 


In this poster, the target audience will be those who consider convenience as a decision factor when purchasing this USB. So, the use of metaphor would increase persuasion on those target audiences.



Ottati, V., Rhoads, S., Graesser, A.C. (1999). 

The effect of metaphor on processing style in a persuasion task: A motivational resonance model. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77(4), 688-697.

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